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Yearbook Jan 2019

36 yearbook 2019 MaGaZINES SOUTH AFRICA with targeted campaigns because we have the audience they want to reach out to, to talk about their offerings. Our audiences are very powerful; they share their experiences of our campaigns, and that word of mouth is very powerful. If we look at ROI on sponsorship packages, the client’s miminum return is more than 100%,” Cloete says. Cekete confirms this: “People are looking for experiences, and brands that traditionally advertise with publications understand that – they know that readers will be reached in terms of the product, and more advertisers are looking for non-traditional methods; they want to know: ‘what can you offer me that will add value?’” Events, adds, Cloete, offer the classic platform for reader engagement, especially as they’re immensely popular with loyal readers. “They want to learn about the magazine, and the people behind it. They also want to have fun, so they’re willing to pay for the ticket to do that.” Though hardly new, events are certainly on the increase. They’re now, adds Raphaely, “acknowledged as a vital part in a magazine-media value chain.” AMP, she reveals, has hosted 200 premium lifestyle events in the last five years, on multiple channels – and has more than 35 partnered events planned for 2019. “The starting point is, as with so many things in our industry, data – we use the insights we have gathered to create events our audiences and consumers love. They trust that our fashion, beauty and lifestyle content that inspires them is leveraged using the latest tech to enhance amplification and reach through our brand channels, while strategic marketing plus our radio and television partnerships maximise the ROI for our clients,” she says. Media24 has also launched a new events division – Media24 Lifestyle Live – which, says Ferreira, “is leading the charge to enhance our quest for reader revenue.” The division will work to dramatically scale the company’s portfolio of ticketed events in the future, adds Ferreira. “Our goal is to create experiential platforms where our diverse audiences can engage with our brands and our commercial partners in an authentic way. We will segment our experiential strategy into three categories: signature events such as Women’s Health’s Fit Night Out or True Love’s Night of Style; series such as MOVE! Stokvel, career master classes, style and beauty tutorials, wellbeing insights, exclusive fitness classes and networking sessions; and bespoke events on behalf of clients.“ That South Africa’s magazine sector has issues to deal with is a certainty, though clearly the black and white issue of race is not one of them. Diversity, all agree, is a key element of long-term sustainability. The global cover story Two prominent UK studies, released in 2018, reveal that the issue of black vs white in magazines – editorial and advertising – is still a hot topic. In April 2018, research released by The Guardian’s data team on a study of 214 covers published by 19 bestselling glossies in 2017, showed that only 20 (9.3%) featured a person of colour. Another study, by Leeds Beckett University, on eight issues of mainstream women’s magazines from 2015 to 2016 showed that the representation of black women in magazines largely pandered to a young, slim, light-skinned, straighthaired ideal. In contrast, women in black magazines were more diversely represented, with weightier women with darker skin featured across editorial and ad pages. The issue of transparency in diversity was heightened in October, when a viral tweet claimed that the US’ Essence magazine – a legacy black women’s mag – had used a black female photographer for their cover shoot for the first time in its nearly 50-year history. The magazine punched back with an illustration of a 1981 cover shot by black female photographer Phyllis Cuington-Wier – and a detailed overview of the various programmes and campaigns it had run and was running to empower black creatives. In similar fashion, much was made of Beyoncé’s deep dive into her Vogue alliance: the singer reportedly took over the issue for the month, in true diva style, selecting her shots, overseeing captions and, more pronouncedly, getting the publication to hire African-American photographer, Tyler Mitchell, to shoot the cover for the first time in its 126-year history.


Yearbook Jan 2019
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