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THE MADIA JUNE 2018

ACTIVATIONS Measurable ROI Activations as a marketing function draw high investment, Bowker says. “It is one of the few marketing techniques used for quantifiable ROI for clients, and it is used as a form of marketing research to better understand target markets and potential consumers.” Kohlöffel agrees. “By measuring with clear ROI objectives, we tend to enjoy the transparency of a successful campaign. What do you want to achieve, where, why and how do we suggest you do this?” Some of the challenges around activations include linguistic diversity and communication, logistics and delays in exports/imports, and lack of certain products and specialised suppliers in the market. Other challenges are working in different climates, differences in consumer behaviour (e.g. price sensitivity), exchange rates and marketing budgets per country. “Africa is not South Africa, that’s the first point to keep in mind,” says Kohlöffel. “Therefore, consistent electricity supply, mobile signal, definition of the campaign objectives, especially if you are working across several countries - all of these can be challenging!” It is very rare that an activation in South Africa would yield the same results in a country like Angola, as there are differences in language, behaviours and cultures, says Bowker. “Tailoring an activation to suit the target market is essential, as the target market and what you want to achieve with that market dictates how you create, manage and execute the activation.” Bowker adds that scale can be challenging. “A large-scale roll-out can cost a lot in the beginning and you are dealing with real people, therefore the resources needed to achieve these results are large. This can be a barrier to nationwide activations versus focusing on one metropolitan area at a time.” Customised campaigns As Setlhodi says, every market is different, so it is close to impossible to have a generic concept for activations and therefore customisation is critical for each region. When dealing with multiple regions within one country as a large roll-out, Bowker says this can be achieved quite well “if the target market for the product is clearly understood and the areas in which you activate speak to these target markets. Kohlöffel adds, “A simple campaign with a brand building message or a product related message for an electronic device, for example, could potentially work across several regions. We do find, however, that the more regional you make the campaign messages – the target market, their habits, the platform being used, etc. – the better the overall results are.” According to Brand Africa.net (2016/7), the most popular brands as listed by category include Coca-Cola, Guinness, Nestle, Toyota, Samsung, MTN, Google and Nike. The top three in banking are GTB (Guaranty Trust Bank), Barclays (ABSA), and Standard Bank (SA). The most admired brands are Samsung, Nike, Adidas, Coca-Cola, and Apple. • Iza Grek is an editor, subeditor, blogger and awardwinning journalist based in Johannesburg. Her interests include media and advertising, personal development, psychology, lifestyle and organisational development. P 48 The Media | wagthedog.co.za C M Y CM MY CY CMY K


THE MADIA JUNE 2018
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