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THE MEDIA APRIL 2018

MEDIA TRAINING The head mentor and students at an equipment hand over at Big Fish School established for former students to explore their capacity as independent filmmakers.” There’s a steady growth in demand for film and TV skills in South Africa, partly as a result of the department of trade and industry (DTI) film incentive programme, and also due to the growth of digital technology creating new platforms, Chait added. • For more information, visit www.bigfish.org.za. Anyone interested in helping fund students can contact Dr Chait at chaitm@bigfish.org.za. Contributions are tax deductable and Big Fish will supply all relevant paperwork for SARS. “Mult iple skills are needed in the industry, from wardrobe design and gafers to photogr aphy directors and soundtrack compos ers as wel as writers, producers and directors .” M-Net’s Magic in Motion Ac ademy The Magic in Motion course has been running since 2015 and to qualify for this, students must have a three-year degree/diploma in drama, film, television or a related media field and no previous permanent employment in the industry. Over a year-long course, they are given experience in key areas of TV and film creation. This includes commissioning, scriptwriting, concept creation, producing, directing, cinematography, sound, art direction, editing, post-production and broadcasting. Up to 20 successful interns are given a monthly stipend over the 12 months, explained Vuyo Sokupa, CSI and stakeholder manager at M-Net. Multiple skills are needed in the industry, Magic in Motion students busy with a practical she said, from wardrobe design and gaffers to directors of photography and soundtrack composers as well as writers, producers and directors. M-Net’s aim is to empower a new generation of African storytellers, she added. “As more players enter the local industry, there is a demand for more stories and more crew who can make what is written on paper a reality. As new people enter our industry, they add a newness - whether in the stories we tell, the way we shoot, the way we edit – and that only makes the industry richer.” The programme started with 12 graduates in 2015, had 20 in 2016 and 13 in 2017. In 2015, the graduates produced and directed four films, IIizwi, The Ring, #Lit, and Forgotten. All in all, eight films have been produced. The programme is only open to South African citizens and only those in Gauteng. M-Net is also “busy planning other new and exciting training opportunities for producers, writers and directors,” added Sokupa. • Applications for 2018 have closed, but for next year, check the website, https://mnetcorporate.dstv. com/2017/11/14/2018-magic-motion-applications/ or email magicinmotion@mnet.co.za. SABC The public broadcaster offers learnerships and internships in partnership with the Media, Information and Communication Technologies SETA (Sector Education and Training Authority). It offered a film and video, and a sound technology learnership from October 2016 to September 2017 and learners were given a stipend of R5 000 per month. The way it works is that the SABC applies to the SETA for funding and once that is approved, the SABC runs the programmes, explained Kaizer Kganyago, SABC’s spokesperson. The current focus of skills is in line with the digital migration of the SABC, he said. In most cases learners were afterwards employed directly by the SABC, but also found employment in a similar industry or could become self-sufficient by starting up their own business. P 38 The Media | wagthedog.co.za


THE MEDIA APRIL 2018
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