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THE MEDIA APRIL 2018

ED’S NOTE ON THE RE CORD… Altered carbon, altered reality Netflix is currently streaming a visually extraordinary series, Altered Carbon, based on the 2002 novel by Richard K. Morgan. Set 300 years in the future, in a cyberpunk fantasy land, it tells the story of a mercenary, Takeshi Kovacs, who is ‘woken up’ 250 years after he died in order to solve the murder of a wealthy man. In this dystopian future, the human mind and soul is contained in a ‘stack’ and bodies are interchangeable, simply known as ‘sleeves’ (kind of puts our obsession with what our bodies look like into perspective). You die, your stack is then placed in a new body. In a stunning scene in the first episode, a bewildered Kovacs explores the world he’s suddenly returned to. What struck me was the vision of an existence in which all advertising is holographic. Flashing holograms sell everything from sex and drugs to products and services in a crazy, swirling, confusing, colourful bombardment enabled by artificial intelligence. At the end of the episode, eyes wide and staring, and mind spinning, I thought about how we currently debate the disruption of television, how we relate to a world full of tangible screens, of streaming and linear TV, and how to monetise the new ways we’re watching content. And how 300 years in the future – if we get there before climate change or a meteor gets us – advertising will still be around. And screens probably won’t, considering how rapidly technology is changing our lives and the world we live in. Back to Earth in the 21st century, screens are a huge part of our daily lives. From our TVs (yes we do still have them) to computers, iPads, smartphones and the digital out of home offerings on roadsides, at point of sale, in Ubers and taxis, our screens are with us 24/7. In this issue, we explore screens and screen issues. We look at the touchy topic of sports broadcasting rights, and how, with social media and streaming, it’s all changing. We find out about digital out of home investment in South Africa. We dive into the world of South African soap operas, something viewers – and advertisers – are completely addicted to. We take a look at the blockbuster year ahead for cinema, and how branded content is increasingly an option to monetise content. We find out whether we’re cutting the cable cord, and how media strategists are planning spend in a multi-screen environment. We might not have screens in the distant future, but right now we have plenty to be going on with. The Media. Got to love it. Glenda EDITOR Glenda Nevill glenda@wagthedog.co.za EDITORIAL BOAR D Dr Melanie Chait, Ferial Haffajee, Jos Kuper, Chris Moerdyk CONTRI BUTORS Britta Reid, Glynis O’Hara, Lucinda Jordaan, Michael Bratt LAYOUT Ideaology: design | advertising | digital Art director: Kate Woodall PRO DUCTION Michelle Pretorius michellep@ideadesign.co.za ADVERTISING SALES Kalyn Fagan kalyn@wagthedog.co.za 060 642 5177 PUBLISHED BY Wag the Dog Publishers (Pty) Ltd. (011) 447-7740/1 243 Jan Smuts Avenue, Parktown North, Johannesburg PUBLISHER Sandra Gordon sgordon@stonesoup.co.za 082 450 8113 Subscribe to The Media digizine The Media Digizine: Visit www.wagthedog.co.za, click on The Media and follow the instructions. The Media Online: Visit www.themediaonline.co.za. Join us on Twitter @MediaTMO and follow us on Facebook. THE MEDIA is distributed to executives within the media sector. The mailing list is updated regularly. Enquiries relating to the list should be addressed to the publisher. Copyright© The Media is a registered trademark. Should you wish to lift any material from the publication, please liaise with the editor beforehand. ISSUE 176 INDEPENDENT INDUSTRY INTELLIGENCE Streaming services vs cable: Are South Africans cord cutting? SPORTS BROADCASTING RIGHTS: A hot button topic and a hot commodity High drama SA’s addictive soapies Television Digital Cinema DOOH THE SCREENS ISSUE CONSUMER PROTE CTION ACT – INDEMNITY CLAUSE “As supplier of the goods/services, you, the Advertiser warrant that you are familiar with and will comply with the provisions of the Consumer Protection Act, Act 68 of 2008 (‘CPA’) in all transactions between us. You indemnify Wag the Dog against any damages that you or any other party may suffer as a result of your non-compliance with the CPA or as a result of any damages suffered by any party.” P 2 The Media | wagthedog.co.za


THE MEDIA APRIL 2018
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