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THE MEDIA APRIL 2018

SPORTS How biding for sports broadcast rights works Throughout the world, sports federations derive a significant proportion of their revenues from the sale of rights to broadcast their matches to broadcasters. Sponsorship income is also closely linked to broadcast rights, as sponsors require visibility for their brand. Without these sources of revenue, sports federations would not be able to meet their numerous obligations, such as the payment of players’ salaries and funding of development programmes. Michael Bratt is a multimedia journalist for Wag the Dog. He previously worked at several high profile media houses including CNBC Africa and Times Media Group. He obtained a Bachelor of Journalism Degree with Honours from Rhodes University. “SuperSport and the SABC have many arangements in place, as the latt er is South Africa’s public broadcaster, mandated to show certain sporting events, but the former holds the rights to them.” Types of sports broadcasting rights Sports broadcasting rights are usually divided into three different types. Firstly, full rights means a broadcaster exclusively shows a tournament or league, with no other broadcaster having access to it. SuperSport has many examples of this. The second type is delayed-live rights. A single broadcaster will be able to broadcast the sporting event live, while other broadcasters can also show it, but not in real-time. This minimises competition for viewers and advertisers for the main rights holder. The other rights holder’s coverage will usually either start an hour or two after the event has begun or ends, depending on the agreement between the secondary rights holder and the sports federation. SuperSport and the SABC have many instances of this. The third kind is a sub-type of full rights, sub-licensed rights. A broadcaster with full rights will sell rights to another broadcaster, and depending on the agreement between them, both will show the sport live, without any delays, or the sub-licensed holder will have to delay it. SuperSport and the SABC have many arrangements of this nature in place, as the latter is South Africa’s public broadcaster, mandated to show certain sporting events, but the former holds the rights to them. • The Media | wagthedog.co.za P 11


THE MEDIA APRIL 2018
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